Staughton Lynd—A ‘Long Distance Runner for Justice’

Staughton Lynd and Freedom School teachers in Ohio | HowardZinn.org

Staughton Lynd speaks with Freedom School teachers in Ohio. Photo: Herbert Randall.

Nov. 22 marks the birthday of Staughton Lynd, longtime friend of Howard Zinn. They both taught at Spelman College and can be described as long-distance runners for justice.
“I have admired [Lynd] enormously ever since I first met him,” Zinn wrote shortly before his death, because he is an “exemplar of strength and gentleness in the quest for a better world.” Read more about Lynd in this tribute by Andy Piascik.

Forever Young: Staughton Lynd

by Andy Piascik

lynd_staughtonandalice_ohcitaction

Staughton and his wife Alice, Quaker pacifists and life-long activists fighting for civil rights, labor rights, and prisoner rights. Image: Ohio Citizen Action.

Suddenly Staughton Lynd is all the rage. Again. In the last several years, Lynd has published two new books, a third that’s a reprint of an earlier work, plus a memoir co-authored with his wife Alice. In addition, a portrait of his life as an activist through 1970 by Carl Mirra of Adelphi University has been published, with another book about his work after 1970 by Mark Weber of Kent State University due soon.

In an epoch of imperial hubris and corporate class warfare on steroids, the release of these books could hardly have come at a better time. Soldier, coal miner, Sixties veteran, recent graduate—there’s much to be gained by one and all from a study of Lynd’s life and work. In so doing, it’s inspiring to discover how frequently he was in the right place at the right time and, more importantly, on the right side.

Forty-nine years ago, during the tumultuous summer of 1964, Lynd was invited to coordinate the Freedom Schools established in Mississippi by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). The schools were an integral part of the Herculean effort to end apartheid in the United States and became models for alternative schools everywhere.

Continue reading at the Zinn Education Project.

 

Comments are closed.